John Heartfield, Robert Heinecken, John Baldessari

Heartfield, Heinecken, Baldessari, three artists who have appropriated photography, who are not themselves photographers, who have kept photography central to the core of their work, have used text to subvert an identified typology and from who I've borrowed, perhaps appropriated, many of their influences .... from me a big thank you. So what is it that differentiates their work from other artists of appropriation? I guess that's copy for alot of debate but at the other end of the 'appropriation' spectrum are the likes of Sherrie Levine and Richard Prince, who at times seem to appropriate photography solely for postmodern 'bon-mots'. John Heartfield pioneered the use of art as a political we

The Art of Appropriation

An exhibition is all about what you leave out and yesterday, as Bridget and myself took down the Rescription show, I went through the boxes of prints that became the 'left-outs'. Many of the cornerstones to 'For Our Love of War' deal with appropriation and what interests me about appropriation is its' economy, It's the final part of editing, and in the images below, the crux of the world is this endless advert, a visceral and all too real quantum of marketing. I understand the critics disquiet over appropriation but the vaguaries of originality are more of a concern. How many billions of photographs are taken every day, re-appropriating the same space time and again. Originality is the art o

Cornucopia, the 57th Issue

Two exhibitions in one month and I'm behind in keeping infront. Cornucopia's 57th Issue is now out and carries an article of a ride I took accross ancient Phrygia in Turkey's Anatolian region in 2016. Published twice a year, Cornucopia is the magazine for connoisseurs of Turkey. This truly remarkable publication is an ever-growing compendium of all things Turkish: history, culture, art, food, travel. The arbiter of taste Tyler Brûlé has described Cornucopia in the Financial Times as ‘a cross between The World of Interiors and National Geographic, with a gentle Turkic twist’. The New York Review of Magazines writes: ‘It’s a truism that the measure of a travel magazine’s success is whether it

The War Sonata Recital & Rescription

William Fergusson's recital of his War Sonata as part of the Rescription exhibition was an extraordinary experience. Infront of an invited audience of 40 we timed the end of the recital with the moment of sundown, giving a heightened presence to the sculptures and paintings of Bridget Heriz and my photographic series, Shot. Mark Cator, 2018, Rescription: For Our Love of War at the UtterBooks studio. Mark Cator, 2018, Rescription: For Our Love of War at the UtterBooks studio. Mark Cator, 2018, Rescription: For Our Love of War at the UtterBooks studio. Mark Cator, 2018, Rescription: For Our Love of War at the UtterBooks studio. Mark Cator, 2018, Rescription: For Our Love of War at the UtterBoo

Rehersing the War Sonata

After a four year delay it was good to be back with William Fergusson rehersing his War Sonata to be 'premiered' at the opening of Rescription: For Our Love of War. Rescription brings to an end a run of 'pop-up' exhibitions held at the UtterBooks studio and is a collaboration between Bridget Heriz, William Fergusson and myself. Mark Cator, 2018, Bridget Heriz & William Fergusson discussing the exhibition, Rescription Mark Cator, 2018, Bridget Heriz & William Fergusson discussing the exhibition, Rescription Mark Cator, 2018, early draft for the War Sonata Mark Cator, 2018, William Fergusson rehersing his War Sonata at the UtterBooks studio